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Monday, 11 November 2019 00:00

A broken toe is generally caused by a heavy object falling on it, or if you stub your toe against a heavy piece of furniture. One of the symptoms that may be experienced is immediate pain and discomfort, followed by possible bruising and swelling. Additionally, it may be difficult to move or bend the affected toe, and in severe fractures, the toe may be bent at an abnormal angle. After a proper diagnosis is performed, which typically consists of having an X-ray taken, correct treatment can begin. This can include taping the broken toe to an adjacent toe, which is referred to as buddy taping. This procedure can be helpful in providing adequate support as the healing process occurs. In severe fractures, it may be helpful to wear a boot that can ensure limited mobility as the toe heals. If you have broken your toe, it is strongly advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can begin the correct treatment technique that is right for you.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 28 October 2019 00:00

Research has indicated that the biomechanics of the ankle may be compromised if high heels are frequently worn. They may affect balance and strength, and this can allow falls to occur. If the desire to wear high heels is strong, it may be beneficial to alternate wearing these types of shoes with shoes that have a lower and wider heel. It may help to perform specific stretches while sitting, and this may aid in restoring strength in the ankle. Additionally, the ankle joints may become more stable, which can help to reduce the risk of injury. Heel lifts are an effective stretch for the entire foot. This is done by standing and slowly lifting the heels up and down, and then alternating feet. If you would like additional information about how to strengthen your feet from frequently wearing high heels, please consult with a podiatrist.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which Parts of My Body Will Be Affected by High Heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What Kinds of Foot Problems Can Develop from Wearing High Heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How Can I Still Wear High Heels and Maintain Foot Health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 28 October 2019 00:00

Living with foot pain is hard on your body.  Give us a call and let us find out what's wrong.

Tuesday, 22 October 2019 00:00

Traumas, diseases, and injuries are among the common causes of foot pain. There are numerous muscles, joints, and ligaments each foot is comprised of, in addition to bands of tissue that absorb shock while walking or participating in sporting activities. The symptoms that are often associated with foot pain can include pain and discomfort in the ankle, difficulty in pointing and flexing the foot, and the foot may feel stiff and weak. There are many working parts to the foot, and the overall structure may be affected if part of the foot should become injured. When pain in the arch exists, it may be indicative of plantar fasciitis. This condition affects the portion of tissue that connects the heel to the toes. If pain is noticed in the top of the foot, Morton’s neuroma may exist. Pain in the big toe and surrounding area may be consistent with a form of arthritis that is known as gout. If you are experiencing any type of pain that affects the feet, it is strongly advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can diagnosis and treat foot pain.

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Livonia
South Tower Professional Building
(734) 591-6612
(734) 591-6625 Fax

14555 Levan Road
Suite E-302
Livonia, MI 48154
Southfield
Chemical Bank
(248) 353-9300
(248) 353-9303 Fax

24725 W. 12 Mile Road
Suite 270
Southfield, MI 48034

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