If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site
We are OPEN and follow CDC guidelines
We're excited to welcome Dr. Kalli Hewitt to our practice on August 1st! Click here to learn more about Dr. Hewitt
Tuesday, 24 May 2022 00:00

While autism is a neurological condition some neurodivergent children, particularly those who are autistic, may have problems with their legs and feet to a greater degree than their neurotypical peers. Autistic children may have low muscle tone or hypotonia which occurs when limbs are floppy and hard to move. Given that autistic children react to external stimuli with sensitivity, their feet may be sensitive to the shoes they wear too. Children with this condition can be uncomfortable with any type of movement including walking, running, and even standing. Some children grow out of this while others do not. Such issues increase autism symptoms and can make the child unhappy or irritable. Specialized footwear, specific exercises, and orthotic inserts might help improve children’s movement. It is suggested that autistic children have regular visits with a podiatrist to check for foot discomfort and help to manage their symptoms.

The health of a child’s feet is vital to their overall well-being. If you have any questions regarding foot health, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tips for Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

  • Make sure their shoes fit properly
  • Look for any signs of in-toeing or out-toeing
  • Check to see if they have Clubfoot (condition that affects your child’s foot and ankle, twisting the heel and toes inward) which is one of the most common nonmajor birth defects.
  • Lightly cover your baby’s feet (Tight covers may keep your baby from moving their feet freely, and could prevent normal development)
  • Allow your toddler to go shoeless (Shoes can be restricting for a young child’s foot)
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails
  • Keep your child’s foot clean and dry
  • Cover cuts and scrapes. Wash any scratches with soap and water and cover them with a bandage until they’ve healed.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What to Do to Keep Your Child’s Feet Healthy
Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

A hammertoe is a deformity where the middle of a toe joint is bent and the end of the toe angles down resembling a claw. It usually involves the second toe but also can involve other toes. A corn often develops on the top of the toe and a callus on the sole of the foot.  Over time, one cannot straighten the toe and walking can become painful. Causes of hammertoe are wearing narrow, short shoes that force the second toe to bend forward or a congenital defect that develops over time. The muscles and tendons in the toe tighten and become shorter. Those who wear high heels or shoes that do not fit properly are more apt to suffer from this condition. Wearing properly fitting footwear that does not put the foot at an angle, with soft insoles to relieve pressure on the toes, can help prevent hammertoe. Since a hammertoe can become painful and interfere with normal functioning, seeing a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment is suggested. Sometimes surgery to straighten the joint will be necessary.

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Hammertoe
Monday, 16 May 2022 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

Many of the first signs that you may be experiencing a bout of gout include redness, swelling, tenderness, and pain in the big toe. While gout often attacks the first joint of the big toe, it can appear in a number of other joints throughout the body, including the ankle, knee, wrist, fingers, and elbow. It is an inflammatory arthritic condition that develops as the result of a buildup of uric acid in the blood system. Uric acid can form crystals in the joints that become inflamed and cause gout symptoms. Attacks can last hours, days, and sometimes weeks, and once you have gout, it may reappear from time to time. Ways to prevent gout include drinking plenty of water, limiting the intake of alcohol, and avoiding foods that are rich in purines. Among the foods noted for high purine levels are shellfish and organ meats, such as liver and kidneys. Maintaining a healthy body weight is another preventative measure, along with eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, and exercising regularly. Several medications that help reduce gout symptoms and decrease uric acid levels in the body can be prescribed by a podiatrist, who also can monitor your condition.   

Gout is a foot condition that requires certain treatment and care. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a type of arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid in the bloodstream. It often develops in the foot, especially the big toe area, although it can manifest in other parts of the body as well. Gout can make walking and standing very painful and is especially common in diabetics and the obese.

People typically get gout because of a poor diet. Genetic predisposition is also a factor. The children of parents who have had gout frequently have a chance of developing it themselves.

Gout can easily be identified by redness and inflammation of the big toe and the surrounding areas of the foot. Other symptoms include extreme fatigue, joint pain, and running high fevers. Sometimes corticosteroid drugs can be prescribed to treat gout, but the best way to combat this disease is to get more exercise and eat a better diet.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Gout
Livonia
South Tower Professional Building
(734) 591-6612
(734) 591-6625 Fax

14555 Levan Road
Suite E-302
Livonia, MI 48154
Southfield
Chemical Bank
(248) 353-9300
(248) 353-9303 Fax

24725 W. 12 Mile Road
Suite 270
Southfield, MI 48034

Copyright © Michigan Foot & Ankle     |     Site Map     |     Nondiscrimination     |     Design by: Podiatry Content Connection