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Monday, 09 December 2019 00:00

The area of the foot where the condition known as Morton’s neuroma develops generally occurs between the third and fourth toes, or the second or third toes. It may happen as a result of an injured nerve, which may come from wearing shoes that are too tight. The symptoms that are typically associated with this condition can consist of tingling, numbness, and a burning pain in the toes. Additionally, Some patients may not be able to feel their toes. Rubbing the area may bring temporary relief, which may also help to move the injured nerve back into position. If you have Morton’s neuroma, a podiatrist may suggest wearing specific pads which can provide adequate arch support, or recommend surgery that can permanently remove the neuroma.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Wednesday, 04 December 2019 00:00

The condition that is known as an ingrown toenail typically affects the big toe. It occurs as a result of the outer edges of the toenail growing into the skin. Patients who are afflicted with this ailment are often familiar with the pain and discomfort an ingrown toenail may cause. If the toenail is infected, there can be drainage oozing from the surrounding area. General reasons why ingrown toenails may develop can include trimming the nails incorrectly, or wearing shoes that do not have ample room for the toes to move freely in. Participating in certain sporting activities where trauma is placed on the toe may contribute to the formation of an ingrown toenail. If you have this condition, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can guide you toward proper treatment techniques.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenails
Wednesday, 27 November 2019 00:00

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to greater issues. Give us a call, and get treated!

Monday, 18 November 2019 00:00

The medical term that is known as peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is described as excess fatty deposits in the arteries. This condition may inhibit blood supply to the feet, and it may be difficult to walk. Patients who are afflicted with PAD may experience a loss of feeling or a tingling sensation in the feet and legs, open sores which do not heal in a timely fashion, and the nails may become brittle. There are a variety of reasons why this condition may occur. These can consist of smoking, having elevated blood pressure, or being diabetic. Painful symptoms may be gradually diminished when gentle stretching techniques are frequently practiced, in addition to implementing healthy eating habits. If you are suffering from PAD, it is recommended  that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to manage this ailment.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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Southfield, MI 48034

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