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Michigan Foot and Ankle Center is now open at both our Livonia and Southfield locations. We continue to implement CDC guidelines for the protection of you and our staff.
Please contact the office to schedule an appointment. If you prefer, our physicians are still available for phone and video conferencing.
Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Heel pain can often be uncomfortable, and may be indicative of existing foot conditions. A common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis, which occurs as a result of a damaged or injured plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is the portion of tissue that connects the heel to the toes, and it can cause severe pain and discomfort if it becomes injured. Additional reasons for heel pain to develop can happen from being overweight, or from standing for extended periods of time throughout the day. Additionally, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly may be a cause of heel pain. Children who participate in running and jumping activities may be susceptible to developing Sever’s disease, which is a condition that affects the growth plate in the heel. If you are experiencing heel pain, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist, who can properly diagnose and treat any type of heel pain, as quickly as possible.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a condition caused by the compression of the tibial nerve in your ankle. The tibial nerve can become compressed as the result of trauma, such as a fall, or from overuse. Tarsal tunnel syndrome might also arise as a complication following an ankle sprain or other lower limb injury, or following surgery. People who are diagnosed with diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis are at an increased risk of developing tarsal tunnel syndrome. The typical symptoms of this condition are a tingling, pins and needles sensation along the inner side of the ankle or foot, pain during extended periods of walking or standing, a burning sensation in the foot at night, and weakness in the muscles that bend the toes. If you are experiencing any symptoms of tarsal tunnel syndrome, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

Corns may develop as a natural protective measure against the pressure and friction endured by your feet. Over time, corns can become uncomfortable as the skin thickens, cracks, or becomes tender. If you have corns on your feet it is recommended to avoid taking long walks or standing for prolonged periods of time, as this could further aggravate the skin. To prevent corns, you may try wearing cushioned socks, wearing comfortable well-fitting shoes, using heel pads or insoles, regularly moisturizing your feet, and avoid walking barefoot. Seeing a podiatrist for your corns is also beneficial. A podiatrist can recommend appropriate footwear, remove callused skin, and prescribe additional treatments to reduce your pain and prevent corns from recurring in the future.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns: What Are They, and How Do You Get Rid of Them
Friday, 24 July 2020 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

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