Monday, 15 January 2018 00:00

Exercises for the feet can be extremely effective in relieving foot pain in addition to preventing possible injuries. Conditions that may benefit from exercise may be plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis. After applying consistent effort, the pain may ease in a few weeks, possibly resulting in much needed relief. An effective stretch for the plantar fascia is to sit while crossing one foot over the knee, pulling the toes back until you feel the muscle stretch. After holding this position for a few seconds, switch to the opposite side. Using a towel that’s wrapped around the ball of your feet while keeping the knees straight and pulling the toes toward the body can be beneficial in stretching the Achilles tendon. Holding this stretch for a few seconds will also stretch out the bottom of the feet. However, before performing any of these stretches speaking with a podiatrist is highly recommended.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries and build strength. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Exercise for Your Feet

Exercise for your feet can help you gain strength, mobility and flexibility in your feet. They say that strengthening your feet can be just as rewarding as strengthening another part of the body. Your feet are very important, and we often forget about them in our daily tasks. But it is because of our feet that are we able to get going and do what we need to. For those of us fortunate enough to not have any foot problems, it is an important gesture to take care of them to ensure good health in the long run.

Some foot health exercises can include ankle pumps, tip-toeing, toe rises, lifting off the floor doing reps and sets, and flexing the toes. It is best to speak with yOur doctors to determine an appropriate regimen for your needs. Everyone’s needs and bodies are different, and the activities required to maintain strength in the feet vary from individual to individual. 

Once you get into a routine of doing regular exercise, you may notice a difference in your feet and how strong they may become.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of one of our offices located Livonia, Southfield, and Dearborn, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 08 January 2018 00:00

Weakened muscles in the toe may cause the tendons to become shorter, enabling the middle joint in the toes to protrude. There may be several causes of this particular condition, referred to as hammertoe, including an inherited predisposition. Symptoms may include experiencing difficulty in walking or not being able to flex and point your toes. Wearing proper footwear is important, especially keeping the heels to 2 inches or less.  If the toes are not able to stretch, surgery may be an option. A consultation with a podiatrist is recommended for a proper diagnosis and the best treatment options.

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Livonia, Southfield, and Dearborn, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 02 January 2018 00:00

This is an exciting time for the Buffalo Bills as they enter the playoffs for the first time since 1999, ending the longest playoff drought in North American professional sports. Running back LeSean McCoy will undergo round the clock treatment to prepare for Sunday’s game against Jacksonville after injuring his right ankle. His frustration was obvious to the trainers attending to him as he pounded his fists on the field. While getting 10 yards on 11 carries, totaling 1138 rushing yards for the season, he will hopefully be an important player to watch heading into this wild-card weekend.

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, Southfield, and Dearborn, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 26 December 2017 00:00

General health is often improved by stretching and exercising your feet on a routine basis.  While walking may be the most beneficial exercise, flexibility and resistance exercises can be just as important in promoting good health and avoiding injury to the feet.  There are many forms of exercise to choose from, many of which can be integrated into your daily routine.  Before beginning, it’s important to allow time for simple stretching; this can help in strengthening the muscles of the feet.  Some exercises may include circling your foot in one direction, then changing to the other direction.  Dropping the heel while standing on a step is another effective stretch for the feet. It's important to remember to contact your podiatrist if you experience pain at any time during these stretches.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with one of our podiatrists  from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Being the backbone of the body, the feet carry your entire weight and can easily become overexerted, causing cramps and pain. As with any body part, stretching your feet can serve many benefits. From increasing flexibility to even providing some pain relief, be sure to give your feet a stretch from time to time. This is especially important for athletes or anyone performing aerobic exercises, but anyone experiencing foot pain or is on their feet constantly should also engage in this practice.

Great ways to stretch your feet:

  • Crossing one leg over the others and carefully pull your toes back. Do 10-20 repetitions and repeat the process for each foot
  • Face a wall with your arms out and hands flat against the wall. Step back with one foot and keep it flat on the floor while moving the other leg forward. Lean towards the wall until you feel a stretch. Hold for 30 seconds and perform 10 repetitions for each foot
  • Be sure not to overextend or push your limbs too hard or you could risk pulling or straining your muscle

Individuals who tend to their feet by regular stretching every day should be able to minimize foot pain and prevent new problems from arising.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, Southfield, and Dearborn, MI. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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