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Michigan Foot and Ankle Center PC, is dedicated to minimizing the spread of disease.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and in order to protect our staff and our patients, we will only be seeing urgent patients in the clinic on an as needed basis Monday to Friday 8-11 AM. For all established patients, we are also offering scheduled phone or video appointments with our doctors. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please call our Livonia office at 734-591-6612 or our Southfield office at 248-353-9300.
Monday, 09 March 2020 00:00

Morton's Neuroma

A neuroma is a thickening of nerve tissue and can develop throughout the body.  In the foot, the most common neuroma is a Morton’s neuroma; this typically forms between the third and fourth toes.  The thickening of the nerve is typically caused by compression and irritation of the nerve; this thickening can in turn cause enlargement and, in some cases, nerve damage.

Neuromas can be caused by anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve.  A common cause is wearing shoes with tapered toe boxes or high heels that force the toes into the toe boxes.  Physical activities that involve repeated pressure to the foot, such as running or basketball, can also create neuromas.  Those with foot deformities, such as bunions, hammertoes, or flatfeet, are more likely to develop the condition.

Symptoms of Morton’s neuroma include tingling, burning, numbness, pain, and the feeling that either something is inside the ball of the foot or that something in one’s shoe or sock is bunched up.  Symptoms typically begin gradually and can even go away temporarily by removing one’s shoes or massaging the foot.  An increase in the intensity of symptoms correlates with the increasing growth of the neuroma.

Treatment for Morton’s neuroma can vary between patients and the severity of the condition.  For mild to moderate cases, padding, icing, orthotics, activity modifications, shoe modifications, medications, and injection therapy may be suggested or prescribed.  Patients who have not responded successfully to less invasive treatments may require surgery to properly treat their condition.  The severity of your condition will determine the procedure performed and the length of recovery afterwards.

Livonia
South Tower Professional Building
(734) 591-6612
(734) 591-6625 Fax

14555 Levan Road
Suite E-302
Livonia, MI 48154
Southfield
Chemical Bank
(248) 353-9300
(248) 353-9303 Fax

24725 W. 12 Mile Road
Suite 270
Southfield, MI 48034

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