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Monday, 18 November 2019 00:00

What is PAD?

The medical term that is known as peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is described as excess fatty deposits in the arteries. This condition may inhibit blood supply to the feet, and it may be difficult to walk. Patients who are afflicted with PAD may experience a loss of feeling or a tingling sensation in the feet and legs, open sores which do not heal in a timely fashion, and the nails may become brittle. There are a variety of reasons why this condition may occur. These can consist of smoking, having elevated blood pressure, or being diabetic. Painful symptoms may be gradually diminished when gentle stretching techniques are frequently practiced, in addition to implementing healthy eating habits. If you are suffering from PAD, it is recommended  that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to manage this ailment.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Livonia
South Tower Professional Building
(734) 591-6612
(734) 591-6625 Fax

14555 Levan Road
Suite E-302
Livonia, MI 48154
Southfield
Chemical Bank
(248) 353-9300
(248) 353-9303 Fax

24725 W. 12 Mile Road
Suite 270
Southfield, MI 48034

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